hoe delen jullie je week in?

Moderators: goldenarrow, Animal

 
 
vrolijk
Berichten: 1822
Geregistreerd: 17-06-03

hoe delen jullie je week in?

Link naar dit bericht Geplaatst door de TopicStarter: 19-09-03 11:29

hallo,
hoe delen jullie je week in met het rijden
ik rij 5 x in de week reining en 1 keer buiten
en hij krijgt dan 2 dagen vrij.
hij is 4 jaar
is dit goed of hoort een paard van zijn leeftijd meer vrij te krijgen Verward

groetjes Lachen


Chantalleke

Berichten: 4633
Geregistreerd: 30-07-02
Woonplaats: Tuitjenhorn

Link naar dit bericht Geplaatst: 19-09-03 11:39

Mijn paardje ws pas 4 toen ik begon. maandag vrij, Dinsdag longeren, Woensdag rijden, Donderdad rijden, Zaterdag Rijden en zondag rijden.

EHt rijden ligt eraan buitenrit of trainen

Euh,...?? Tsjah,...

Solide

Berichten: 5481
Geregistreerd: 06-04-03
Woonplaats: Ergens in het zonnige zuiden

Link naar dit bericht Geplaatst: 19-09-03 11:41

Ik rijd die van mij (4 jarige merrie) ook zo'n 5 keer in de week. Maar niet altijd even fanatiek. Minstens 1x in de week een lekkere buitenrit om wat uit te waaien. En als ik geen tijd heb om te rijden dan longeer ik haar.

Wacht niet op later. Als later iets eerder komt, ben je te laat....

Op het eind van mijn geld hou ik altijd een stuk maand over......

Irene K.

Berichten: 315
Geregistreerd: 06-09-01
Woonplaats: N-Holland

Link naar dit bericht Geplaatst: 19-09-03 11:42

Lees dit artikel maar eens; is van Sugar Miss:
Groetjes, Irene K.

Quote:
About Ranger, a 2,5 year old:
Right now though I want to return to the issue of maturity and deal with that concept thoroughly. Ranger is not mature, as I said, as a 2 1/2 year old. This is NOT because Ranger is a "slow-maturing" individual or because he comes from a "slow maturing" breed. There is no such thing. Let me repeat that: no horse on earth, of any breed, at any time, is or has ever been mature before the age of six (plus or minus six months). This information comes, I know, as a shock to many people who think starting their colt or filly under saddle at age two is what they ought to be doing. This begs discussion of (1) what I mean by "mature" and (2) what I mean by "starting."

(1) Just about everybody has heard of the horse's "growth plates," and commonly when I ask 'em, people tell me that the "growth plates" are somewhere around, or in, the horse's knees (actually they're located at the bottom of the radius-ulna bone just above the knee). This is what gives rise to the saying that, before riding the horse, it's best to wait "until his knees close" (i.e., until the growth plates fuse to the bone shaft and cease to be separated from it by a layer of slippery, crushable cartilage). What people often don't realize is that there is a "growth plate" on either end of EVERY bone behind the skull, and in the case of some bones (like the pelvis, which has many "corners") there are multiple growth plates.

So do you then have to wait until ALL these growth plates fuse? No. But the longer you wait, the safer you'll be. Owners and trainers need to realize there's a definite, easy-to-remember schedule of fusion - and then make their decision as to when to ride the horse based on that rather than on the external appearance of the horse. For there are some breeds of horse - the Quarter Horse is the premier among these - which have been bred in such a manner as to LOOK mature long before they actually ARE mature. This puts these horses in jeopardy from people who are either ignorant of the closure schedule, or more interested in their own schedule (for futurities or other competitions) than they are in the welfare of the animal.

The process of fusion goes from the bottom up. In other words, the lower down toward the hoofs you look, the earlier the growth plates will have fused; and the higher up toward the animal's back you look, the later. The growth plate at the top of the coffin bone (the most distal bone of the limb) is fused at birth. What this means is that the coffin bones get no TALLER after birth (they get much larger around, though, by another mechanism). That's the first one. In order after that:

2. Short pastern - top & bottom between birth and 6 mos.
3. Long pastern - top & bottom between 6 mos. And 1 yr.
4. Cannon bone - top & bottom between 8 mos. And 1.5 yrs.
5. Small bones of knee - top & bottom on each, between 1.5 and 2.5 yrs.
6. Bottom of radius-ulna - between 2 and 2.5 yrs.
7. Weight-bearing portion of glenoid notch at top of radius - between 2.5 and 3 yrs.
8. Humerus - top & bottom, between 3 and 3.5 yrs.
9. Scapula - glenoid or bottom (weight-bearing) portion - between 3.5 and 4 yrs.
10. Hindlimb - lower portions same as forelimb
11. Hock - this joint is "late" for as low down as it is; growth plates on the tibial & fibular tarsals don't fuse until the animal is four (so the hocks are a known "weak point" - even the 18th-century literature warns against driving young horses in plow or other deep or sticky footing, or jumping them up into a heavy load, for danger of spraining their hocks)
12. Tibia - top & bottom, between 2.5 and 3 yrs.
13. Femur - bottom, between 3 and 3.5 yrs.; neck, between 3.5 and 4 yrs.; major and 3rd trochanters, between 3 and 3.5 yrs.
14. Pelvis - growth plates on the points of hip, peak of croup (tubera sacrale), and points of buttock (tuber ischii), between 3 and 4 yrs.

...and what do you think is last? The vertebral column, of course. A normal horse has 32 vertebrae between the back of the skull and the root of the dock, and there are several growth plates on each one, the most important of which is the one capping the centrum. These do not fuse until the horse is at least 5 1/2 years old (and this figure applies to a small-sized, scrubby, range-raised mare. The taller your horse and the longer its neck, the later full fusion will occur. And for a male - is this a surprise? -- you add six months. So, for example, a 17-hand TB or Saddlebred or WB gelding may not be fully mature until his 8th year - something that owners of such individuals have often told me that they "suspected" ).

The lateness of vertebral "closure" is most significant for two reasons. One: in no limb are there 32 growth plates! Two: The growth plates in the limbs are (more or less) oriented perpendicular to the stress of the load passing through them, while those of the vertebral chain are oriented parallel to weight placed upon the horse's back. Bottom line: you can sprain a horse's back (i.e., displace the vertebral growth plates) a lot more easily than you can sprain those located in the limbs. And here's another little fact: within the chain of vertebrae, the last to fully "close" are those at the base of the animal's neck (that's why the long-necked individual may go past 6 yrs. to achieve full maturity). So you also have to be careful - very careful - not to yank the neck around on your young horse, or get him in any situation where he strains his neck (i.e., better learn how to get a horse broke to tie before you ever tie him up, so that there will be no likelihood of him ever pulling back hard. And readers if you don't know how to do this, then please somebody write in and ask!).

Now, the other "maturity" question I always get is this: "so how come if my colt is not skeletally mature at age 2 he can be used at stud and sire a foal?" My answer to that is this: sure, sweetie, if that's how you want to define maturity, then every 14 year old boy is mature. In other words, the ability to achieve an erection, penetrate a mare, and ejaculate some semen containing live sperm cells occurs before skeletal maturity, both in our species and in the horse. However, even if you only looked at sperm counts or other standard measures of sexual maturity that are used for livestock, you would know that considering a 2 year old a "stallion" is foolish. Male horses do not achieve the testicular width or weight, quality or quantity of total ejaculate, or high sperm counts until they're six. Period. And people used to know this; that's why it's incorrect to refer to any male horse younger than 4 as a "stallion," whether he's in service or not. Peoples' confusion on this question is also why we have such things as the Stallion Rehabilitation Program at Colorado State University or the behavior-modification clinic at Cornell - because a two year old colt is no more able to "take command" on a mental or psychological level of the whole process of mating - which involves everything from "properly" being able to ask the mare's permission, to actually knowing which end of her to jump on, to being able to do this while some excited and usually frightened humans are banging him on the nose with a chain - than is a 14 year old boy.

(2) Now, let's turn to the second discussion, which is what I mean by "starting" and the whole history of that. Many people today - at least in our privileged country -- do not realize how hard you can actually work a horse - which is very, very hard. But before you can do that without significantly damaging the animal, you have to wait for him to mature, which means - waiting until he is four to six years old before asking him to carry you on his back. What bad will happen if you put him to work as a riding horse before that? Two important things - and probably not what you're thinking of. What is very UNlikely to happen is that you'll damage the growth plates in his legs. At the worst, there may be some crushing of the cartilages, but the number of cases of deformed limbs due to early use is tiny. The cutting-horse futurity people, who are big into riding horses as young as a year and a half, will tell you this and they are quite correct. Want to damage legs? There's a much better way - just overfeed your youngstock (see Forum postings on this. You ought to be able to see the animal's ribs - not skeletal, but see 'em - until he's two).

More likely is that you'll cause structural damage to his back. There are some bloodlines (in Standardbreds, Arabians, and American Saddlebreds) known to inherit weak deep intervertebral ligament sheathing; these animals are especially prone to the early, sudden onset of "saddle back". However, individuals belonging to these bloodlines are by no means the only ones who may have their back "slip" and that's because, as mentioned above, the stress of weightbearing on the back passes parallel to the growth plates as well as the intervertebral joints. However, I want to add that the frequency of slipped backs in horses under 6 years old is also very low.

So, what's to worry about? Well...did you ever wish your horse would "round up" a little better? Collect a little better? Respond to your leg by raising his back, coiling his loins, and getting his hindquarter up underneath him a little better? The young horse knows, by feel and by "instinct", that having a weight on his back puts him in physical jeopardy. I'm sure that all of you start your youngstock in the most humane and considerate way that you know how, and just because of that, I assure you that after a little while, your horse knows exactly what that saddle is and what that situation where you go to mount him means. And he loves you, and he is wiser than you are, so he allows this. But he does not allow it foolishly, against his deepest nature, which amounts to a command from the Creator that he must survive; so when your foot goes in that stirrup, he takes measures to protect himself.

The measures he takes are the same ones YOU would take in anticipation of a load coming onto your back: he stiffens or braces the muscles of his topline, and to help himself do that he may also brace his legs and hold his breath ("brace" his diaphragm). The earlier you choose to ride your horse, the more the animal will do this, and the more often you ride him young, the more you reinforce in his mind the necessity of responding to you in this way. So please - don't come crying to me when your 6 year old (that was started under saddle as a two year old) proves difficult to round up! (Not that I'm not gonna help you but GEEZ).
If he does not know how to move with his back muscles in release, he CANNOT round up!!

So - bottom line - if you are one of those who equates "starting" with "riding," then I guess you better not start your horse until he's four. That would be the old, traditional, worldwide view: introduce the horse to equipment (all kinds of equipment and situations) when he's two, crawl on and off of him at three, saddle him to begin riding him and teaching him to guide at four, start teaching him maneuvers or the basics of whatever job he's going to do - cavalletti or stops or something beyond trailing cattle - at five, and he's on the payroll at 6. The old Spanish way of bitting reflected this also, because the horse's teeth aren't mature (i.e., the tushes haven't come in and all the permanent teeth) until he's six either.

This is what I'd do if it were my own horse. Now I'm at liberty to do that because I'm not on anybody else's schedule except my horse's own schedule. I'm not a participant in futurities or planning to be. Are you? If you are, well, that's your business. But most horse owners aren't. Please ask yourself: is there any reason that you have to be riding that particular horse before he's four?

There is one last consideration before I go back to direct discussion of Ranger's physique. When I say "start" a horse I do NOT equate that with riding him. To start a young horse well is one of the finest tests (and proofs) of superior horsemanship. Anyone who does not know how to start a horse does not know how to finish one. The animal does not belong inside a fence or in a stall, and yet that's where he's gonna have to live and work. You, the owner, have the following as a minimum list of "things to accomplish" together with your young horse before he's four years old when you DO start him under saddle:

1. Comfortable being touched all over. COMFORTABLE not put-upon or tolerate, but comfortable as in man he really looks forward to it.
2. This includes interior of mouth, muzzle, jowls, ears, sheath/udder, tail, front feet and hind feet. Pick 'em up and they should be floppy.
3. Knows how to lead up. No fear; no drag in the feet.
4. Manners enough to lead at your shoulder, stop or go when he sees your body get ready to stop or go; if spooks does not jump toward or onto you, will not violate your space unless specifically invited to do so.
5. Leads through gate or into stall without charging.
6. Knows how to tie and knows what his options are when tied.
7. Ponies.
8. Carries smooth nonleverage bit in mouth. Lowers head and opens mouth when asked; bit can be removed without horse throwing his head up.
9. Will work with a drag (tarp, sack half filled with sand, light tire, or sledge and harness)
10. Mounts drum or sturdy stand with front feet.
11. Free longes - come when called and respond calmly to driving request - relaxed and eager.
12. When started, leaves without any sign of fleeing; when stopped, plants hind feet and coils loins - does not depend on your hand to stop him.
13. Familiar with being girthed; if necessary, allowing horse to work out any need to buck in pen at liberty.
14. Knows how to back up
15. Loads in trailer (he must know how to back up before loading him in).

...And various people might like to add to this list. Please do...just so long as what you're asking your young horse isn't more than he can physically do. Mentally and emotionally - those are the big areas in getting one started. I've had people act, when I gave them the above facts and advice about starting youngstock, like waiting four years was just MORE than they could possibly stand. I think they feel this way because the list of things which they would like to include as necessary before attempting to ride is very short - their whole focus is on riding as why they bought the animal and they think they have a right to this. Well...the horse, good friend to mankind that he is, will soon show them what HE thinks they have a right to. And what the horse will allow will be more generous, I assure you, than some of these people deserve.

So what else to say about Ranger? By the time he's fully mature, he'll have a more muscular neck, which he will want (if he's allowed in the training process) to arch more at the base but carry lower at the poll. His back will be a little longer than it now is, the withers will be higher and the loins a little broader. His pelvis will be longer and the musculature covering it will be much fuller. He has (typical of TWH) already a tremendous shoulder and a wonderful long arm - he'll have a heckuva long, flowing forward reach. He has good crisp hocks and is not more crooked in the hindlimb than I think proper for his breed - he's only slightly more angulated/long in the hindlimb than I would ideally like. He's got adequate (not outstanding) "bone", and good-sized, well-shaped hoofs.

Ranger's back is held a little stiffly and I'm sure the owner knows why by now. Many folks who own gaited breeds complain that they (TWH, Pasos, ASB, Rocky Mtn., etc., etc.) have a "tendency" to hard-pace rather than four-beat gait, and this also comes from the habitual stiffening of the back. Gaiting (all forms of it) has the same footfall ORDER (left hind, left fore, right hind, right fore) and basic mechanism as the ordinary walk (what TWH people call a "dog walk") - and no horse can walk in good rhythm with good "reach" and good "nod" unless his back is free to oscillate both up and down and (especially) from side to side in time with the motions of his legs. Take away the emotional worry and mental concern...teach the animal to release the muscles of his topline and those of the crest of his neck...and all your concerns with whether he has a good "nod" or why he is maybe pacing are going to fade right away.

Thanks for writing in, and please give ol' Ranger a little scratchin' in his favorite spot for me.
Best wishes...Dr. Deb


All contents property of Equine Studies Institute - © 1999 - 2003
01/17/2003 11:46:04 PM

flettie

Berichten: 8420
Geregistreerd: 19-09-02
Woonplaats: Osterwald (Dld)

Link naar dit bericht Geplaatst: 19-09-03 11:45

Mijn paardje is 3 en ik rij 3-4 keer per week. Dinsdagavond clubles, donderdag vaak longeren, zaterdag+zondag rijden (waarbij op een van die twee dagen privé-les).

Of die van jou meer behoort te krijgen? Geen idee, het is maar net wat jouw paard aangeeft wat hij wil. Voor de mijne is max. 4 keer in de week werken genoeg, daar blijft ze vrolijk en werkwillig van. Ga ik meer rijden dan wordt ze gelijk een stuk minder enthousiast. Gelukkig heb ik zelf ook niet echt veel meer tijd om met haar te rijden. Soms liever een goede poetsbeurt dan mezelf op haar afbeulen Haha!

Dunla B+12 L1+18, L2+11, M1+3

pacster

Berichten: 709
Geregistreerd: 24-04-03
Woonplaats: ruurlo

Link naar dit bericht Geplaatst: 19-09-03 12:09

maandag rijden, dinsdag rijden, woensdag rijden, donderdag rijden, vrijdag les.. zaterdag vaak vrij anders vrijheidsdressuur, zondag rijden, vaak buiten. als ik geen zin heb om te rijden door de week longeren of los in de bak en vrijheidsdressuur. vaak buiten uitstappen.. hij is ook vier..

euhm.. Scheve mond

Vera

Berichten: 12109
Geregistreerd: 10-04-01

Link naar dit bericht Geplaatst: 19-09-03 13:32

vrolijk schreef:
hallo,
hoe delen jullie je week in met het rijden
ik rij 5 x in de week reining en 1 keer buiten
en hij krijgt dan 2 dagen vrij.
hij is 4 jaar
is dit goed of hoort een paard van zijn leeftijd meer vrij te krijgen Verward

groetjes Lachen


5x reining + 1x buiten + 2 dagen vrij = 8 dagen Verward Mijn weken tellen maar 7 dagen Knipoog

Let horses whisper in your ear and breathe on your heart

cornelie

Berichten: 9349
Geregistreerd: 11-06-01

Link naar dit bericht Geplaatst: 19-09-03 15:14

Om de dag train ik. Spieren hebben 48 uur nodig om zich aan te passen dus hiermee krijg ik ook betere spiergroei. En zo blijft hij ook lekker in zijn koppie. De tussendagen ga ik lekker naar buiten, verder werken aan mijn parelli lessen of vrijheidsdressuur.

jilleroo

Berichten: 5597
Geregistreerd: 03-09-02
Woonplaats: Zwollywood

Link naar dit bericht Geplaatst: 19-09-03 15:36

ik denk dat je vooral aan moet voelen hoe vaak en intensief je kan rijden met je paard.
baily staat voorlopig vrij veel stil en af en toe voor de kar of als ik een goeie dag heb onder zadel. vakantieperiode voor hem dus..


WARNING: The above post may contain sarcasm and/or sophisticated satire. Any psychological damage sustained is purely your fault!

Bojangles

Berichten: 13704
Geregistreerd: 23-06-02
Woonplaats: Drenthe

Link naar dit bericht Geplaatst: 19-09-03 16:06

Ik rijd 4/5/6 keer in de week, de ene keer intensiever/langer als de andere keer. Of ik wissel af half uurtje bak/half uurtje langs de weg bijv.
Of alleen een buitenrit, de ene keer 1 keer in de week, de andere keer 2/3 keer in de week, het ligt er maar net aan.
Verder longeer ik en doe vrijheidsdressuur.
De rest van haar vrije tijd brengt ze door in het land (dag & nacht).

Joyce de Vos - Horse Charms Webshop - Horse Agility NL - Painting Pony
Let op wegens tijdgebrek en andere bezigheden, ben ik nauwelijks meer actief op Bokt. Graag niet PB-en, maar mailen voor snel bereik :) Bedankt!

vrolijk
Berichten: 1822
Geregistreerd: 17-06-03

Link naar dit bericht Geplaatst door de TopicStarter: 19-09-03 17:29

vera"]
[quote="vrolijk schreef:
hallo,
hoe delen jullie je week in met het rijden
ik rij 5 x in de week reining en 1 keer buiten
en hij krijgt dan 2 dagen vrij.
hij is 4 jaar
is dit goed of hoort een paard van zijn leeftijd meer vrij te krijgen Verward

groetjes Lachen


5x reining + 1x buiten + 2 dagen vrij = 8 dagen Verward Mijn weken tellen maar 7 dagen Knipoog
[/quote]

bedoel van de 5 dagen rijden 1 x naar buiten
beetje stom getypt *LOL*

vrolijk
Berichten: 1822
Geregistreerd: 17-06-03

Link naar dit bericht Geplaatst door de TopicStarter: 19-09-03 17:29

Chantalleke schreef:
Mijn paardje ws pas 4 toen ik begon. maandag vrij, Dinsdag longeren, Woensdag rijden, Donderdad rijden, Zaterdag Rijden en zondag rijden.

EHt rijden ligt eraan buitenrit of trainen


ik bedoel een buitenrit

vrolijk
Berichten: 1822
Geregistreerd: 17-06-03

Link naar dit bericht Geplaatst door de TopicStarter: 19-09-03 17:39

ik rij ook zonder zadel met alleen een halster touw en wel is met bosal enzo. indergeval probeer ik veel af te wisselen zodat ie de reining leuk blijft vinden als ie het dan al leuk vind Verward
ook stap ik na het rijden een stuk buiten zodat ie goed is uitgestapt.


zo als ik het zo lees is mijn rooster niet slecht Haha!

ik wil ook wel graag longeren maar dat lukt mij niet
(losbreek paard Boos! ) dat is hem nooit goed geleerd denk ik
dus ben altijd afhankelijk van diegene die dat wel kan doen met hem (dubbelen lijn) daar kan ik dus nog niet mee longe.

ps. irene k. ik zal zo wel ff het berichtje lezen het is zoveel en engels dus moet er ff de tijd voor nemen *LOL*

groetjes

jessy
Berichten: 1041
Geregistreerd: 15-07-02
Woonplaats: Michigan, VS

Link naar dit bericht Geplaatst: 19-09-03 17:41

Goed stuk geplaatst door Irene K.

Definitely food for thought.

Morrie

Berichten: 17821
Geregistreerd: 08-07-03
Woonplaats: 't Gooi

Link naar dit bericht Geplaatst: 19-09-03 18:45

jammer genoeg kan ik die Engelse tekst niet lezen, zal ongetijfeld in staan hoe ik het zou moeten doen...

ik heb een koudbloed van 4 1/2, die zijn meestal pas tegen 6 jaar uitgegroeid en ook in de kop zijn ze laat volwassen.

Ik rij op donderdag een privéles van een uur om de "knoppen"erop te krijgen, hij is al wel betuigd in Oostenrijk, maar onder het zadel snapt ie geen bal van

Vrijdag vrij (vrij =van de wei nar de boerderij naast de fiets in draf (10 minuten), eten en weer terug naar de wei)
Zaterdag een buitenritje waar ik alleen maar vraag dat ie braaf is en niet teveel schrikt....
Zondag idem, soms vrij
Maandag vrij
Dinsdag longeren, bijgezet met als doel de onderhals weg te trainen en een minder ontwikkeld achterbeen erbij te krijgen
Woensdag vrij

enz.

Van de zomer reed ik hem iedere dag buiten, maar hij werd steeds schrikkeriger en nerveuzer, dit schema is zolang hij op de wei staat (1 nov.) en in overleg met de instructrice. Na 1 nov. herzien we de zaak.

Wil je vlinders in je buik? Duw dan een rups in je kont!

steeffie

Berichten: 2326
Geregistreerd: 23-05-02

Link naar dit bericht Geplaatst: 19-09-03 18:52

Ik rijd mijn 3-jarige paard 4/5 keer per week. Twee keer s'avonds in de les, 2 keer voor mezelf, of (met mooi weer Knipoog ) 1 keer voor mezelf en 1 keer buiten, en soms nog prive les. De andere dagen heeft ze vrij, alleen als ze niet loskan dan longeer ik haar wel eens.

vrolijk
Berichten: 1822
Geregistreerd: 17-06-03

Link naar dit bericht Geplaatst door de TopicStarter: 19-09-03 19:10

ik weet niet of ik het goed lees (het berichtje van irene k.)
maar als ik het goed begrijp zijn paarden pas volwassen als ze 6 jaar zijn
dat verbaasd me niks maar bedoelen ze er dan ook mee dat je pas moet beginnen met rijden als ze 6 jaar zijn Verward
omdat ze dan pas uit gegroeit zijn?
verbeter maar als ik het fout heb hoor want ben niet zo goed in het lezen van engelse teksten *LOL*

groetjes Lachen

DubbelDun

Berichten: 66330
Geregistreerd: 12-04-01
Woonplaats: 1 km van het midden van Nederland

Link naar dit bericht Geplaatst: 19-09-03 19:20

Het paard zijn beendergestel is volgroeid als ze rond de 6 jaar oud zijn. Dat houdt niet in dat je er dan pas op mag rijden, maar wel dat belasting pas op latere leeftijd aan te raden is omdat bij jongere paarden de belasting groeistoornissen geeft c.q. beenproblemen die op latere leeftijd pas gaan opspelen.

Te koop: boomloos zadel van goede kwaliteit
http://www.bokt.nl/markt/ad/430699/boom ... l-colorado

vrolijk
Berichten: 1822
Geregistreerd: 17-06-03

Link naar dit bericht Geplaatst door de TopicStarter: 19-09-03 19:44

Sugarmiss schreef:
Het paard zijn beendergestel is volgroeid als ze rond de 6 jaar oud zijn. Dat houdt niet in dat je er dan pas op mag rijden, maar wel dat belasting pas op latere leeftijd aan te raden is omdat bij jongere paarden de belasting groeistoornissen geeft c.q. beenproblemen die op latere leeftijd pas gaan opspelen.


oh dus dat hoe later je begint hoe beter het eigenlijk is
en als je begint met inrijden de zware balstingen zoals bijv. de stops niet te doen.
ik ben al blij datze face off pas op zijn 3 1/2 hebben ingereden
en niet eens echt zwaar dus geen stops of spins nu hij 4 is doen we dat wel maar niet zo dat hij dat elke dag moet ben meer met soepel maak oefeningen bezig.
maar als hij wat soepeler is ga ik wel beginnen met stop enz. en dat zal niet op zijn 6 de zijn ,maar het is goed om in gd8 te houden dat nog niet alles is volgroeit.

groetjes

Bojangles

Berichten: 13704
Geregistreerd: 23-06-02
Woonplaats: Drenthe

Link naar dit bericht Geplaatst: 19-09-03 20:13

Mijn paard is al 7 maar nog een jaar onder het zadel, maakt dit ook verschil?

Joyce de Vos - Horse Charms Webshop - Horse Agility NL - Painting Pony
Let op wegens tijdgebrek en andere bezigheden, ben ik nauwelijks meer actief op Bokt. Graag niet PB-en, maar mailen voor snel bereik :) Bedankt!

DubbelDun

Berichten: 66330
Geregistreerd: 12-04-01
Woonplaats: 1 km van het midden van Nederland

Link naar dit bericht Geplaatst: 19-09-03 20:38

Een ouder paard zal er iets langer over doen om soepel te worden en misschien dat hij het iets minder snel 'oppakt'.
Maar met de juiste voorbereiding kan hij net zo ver komen.

Te koop: boomloos zadel van goede kwaliteit
http://www.bokt.nl/markt/ad/430699/boom ... l-colorado

steppie
Berichten: 13
Geregistreerd: 24-09-03
Woonplaats: soest

Link naar dit bericht Geplaatst: 28-09-03 20:10

ik vindt dat 2 dagen vrij goed is voor een paard van 4
de mijne greeg 3 dagen vrij toen hij 2 was dus 2 dagen voor een 4 jarige is zat (vooral als je wedstrijden gaat rijden)

Toekie

Berichten: 8042
Geregistreerd: 18-06-03
Woonplaats: Somewhere over the rainbow

Link naar dit bericht Geplaatst: 28-09-03 20:31

Ik rij 4x in de week op m'n paard (2x zelf een half uur, 1x priveles van een half uur, 1x groepsles van een uur). Daarnaast wordt Bonanza 1x in de week door Wendy getraind (half uur) en hij gaat 1x in de week in de stapmolen. Op zaterdag heeft hij een vrije dag. Bonnie is 3,5 jaar, er wordt natuurlijk wel rekening gehouden met zijn leeftijd tijdens de lessen/trainingen. Hij is nog nooit de bossen in geweest (heb m nog niet zo lang). Maar het is wel de bedoeling dat ik lekkere buitenritjes ga maken Haha! .

Ob-la-di ob-la-da, life goes on... brah! :D

chex

Berichten: 409
Geregistreerd: 27-01-03
Woonplaats: gouda

Link naar dit bericht Geplaatst: 29-09-03 17:28

Ik train met Chex 4x per week, driekwartier tot anderhalf uur(ligt eraan hoe het gaat). Meestal 1x per week een buitenrit. 1 a 2x per week aan de longe en 1 dag per week rust( loslaten of in de wei). Ik probeer 1x per week een uur priveles te nemen. Chex is nu 7 jaar. Het is wel een paard wat veel afwisseling nodig heeft.

Sprite

Berichten: 608
Geregistreerd: 03-07-01
Woonplaats: Drenthe

Link naar dit bericht Geplaatst: 01-10-03 15:59

Ik heb geen tijd om het, hoogstwaarschijnlijk zeer interessante stuk engelse tekst, te lezen, dus vergeef me als het daarin al genoemd wordt... maar ik wil nog even het volgende toevoegen:

Voor een jong paard is niet alleen de fysieke kant van belang, maar ook zeker de mentale kant. Daarom is het verstandig om een jong paard, niet te lang en/of intensief te trainen.
Het zit em dus niet zozeer in hoeveel dagen per week, maar wat je met het paard doet en hoe lang je met hem bezig bent.

Overvraag hem mentaal gezien niet... dus niet te veel nieuwe dingen achter elkaar en rustig aan als hij ergens moeite mee heeft.
Wissel je training veel af met ontspannende dingen, ga regelmatig naar buiten, doe wat relaxed grondwerk met hem, of ga in de roundpenn freestylen of zo.

Dus niet een uur intensief trainen met een 4 jarige, maar bv 15-20 minuten is genoeg, langer kan hij zijn aandacht er toch niet bijhouden en gaat het alleen maar slechter... en een kwartiertje trainen en dan nog even het bos in bv is ook leuk Lachen

Maar zo te lezen, gaan jullie allemaal prima met de paardjes om, dus dit postje is eigenlijk overbodig, hihihi Knipoog

*****


Wie is er online

Gebruikers op dit forum: Geen geregistreerde gebruikers en 4 bezoekers