The Jersey act

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Himyar

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The Jersey act

Link naar dit bericht Geplaatst door de TopicStarter: 18-09-03 09:44

Wie weet er meer van de Jersey act? Ik las laatst ergens (ik weet niet meer waar) dat deze mede door de Engelsen zou zijn opgesteld, omdat er in de bloedlijn van Amerikaanse Volbloeden hier en daar (o.a.?) Quarter horses zouden ingekruisd!? Weet iemand hier meer over?

http://www.tbheritage.com/Portraits/Durbar.html :

Although a stakes winner herself from an impeccable female line, the glaring error was that of her grandsire Hanover, one of America's great champions and sires. His own pedigree was a mix of English and American bloodlines, although several of those American roots were of dubious descent, that is, not from "thoroughbred" descent. In 1913, the Jockey Club had passed the notorious Jersey Act, which barred from registration horses which could not trace their pedigrees back flawlessly to the General Stud Book, a matter upheld by Weatherbys', which published the stud book. This, naturally, included many American-breds, especially those carrying the blood of Hanover, despite the fact that his daughter Rhoda B. had already produced two English classic winners in English and Irish Derby winner Orby (foaled in 1904) and 1,000 Guineas winner Rhodora (foaled 1905).


Himyar

Berichten: 3587
Geregistreerd: 14-08-01

Link naar dit bericht Geplaatst door de TopicStarter: 18-09-03 10:10

Even voor de duidelijkheid, een Quarter horse hoort hier dus niet in thuis Haha! Knipoog *LOL* :
http://www.weatherbys-group.com
http://www.thebritishthoroughbred.co.uk/breed_stud.asp
http://www.thebritishthoroughbred.co.uk ... origin.asp :


The Thoroughbred has its roots in the 17th century when British breeders began crossing their native mares with imported stallions from North Africa and the Middle East. Every modern Thoroughbred can trace its ancestry back to one of three founding sires - Godolphin Arabian, Byerley Turk and the Darley Arabian.

Early Thoroughbreds ran in match races, mostly at around four miles, which suited the stamina-rich, tough Arabian influence. Racing changed in the latter quarter of the 18th Century, with the introduction of the far shorter St Leger, Oaks and Derby, and the increasing emphasis on racing two and three year old horses.

Meanwhile, British exports of stallions and mares were forming the basis of Thoroughbred populations overseas. Diomed, winner of the inaugural Derby in 1780, was exported to America at the age of 21 and was instrumental in shaping the breed there. France, Germany and Italy were among other importers of high-class stock throughout the 19th Century and up to the present day.

There is no doubt that the British influence on the Thoroughbred breed has been and remains exceptional. There are over 125,000 Thoroughbred foals born worldwide, and each one can trace their ancestry back through the sire's line to one of the three founding sires.



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