vast een heel domme vraag

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paardje

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vast een heel domme vraag

Link naar dit bericht Geplaatst door de TopicStarter: 04-04-02 11:49

wat is eventing??? Verward Frusty Lips are sealed

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Nikita

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Link naar dit bericht Geplaatst: 04-04-02 11:56

Is dat niet de nieuwe naam voor military?

Wie met beide benen op de grond blijft staan, komt niet ver..

paardje

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Link naar dit bericht Geplaatst door de TopicStarter: 04-04-02 12:12

ja zou kunnen

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loulou

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Link naar dit bericht Geplaatst: 04-04-02 12:17

dat is toch cross, toch?

paardje

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Link naar dit bericht Geplaatst door de TopicStarter: 04-04-02 12:18

military is volgens mij terreincross ja

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Imker

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Link naar dit bericht Geplaatst: 04-04-02 12:36

Eventing =

dressuurproef, springparcours en dan een terreinrit met hindernissen binnen een bepaalde tijd (of het dichtst bij de optimale tijd) rijden....
a.s. zondag is er eventing in Etten Leur.

Achilles Spr. B+20 Dr. L1+21 L2+17 M1+2!!
Olivius Dr. L2+15 M1+13, M2+15, Z1+10, Z2+2, promotie naar P-paard!!!

Cassidy

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Link naar dit bericht Geplaatst: 04-04-02 12:41

What is Eventing?

Our sport could be termed an "equestrian triathlon". It involves working with your horse both on the flat and over jumps. Over the centuries it has developed from the tests for the ideal military charger. Today, the sport is most known for its cross-country phase where horse and rider gallop over an outside course of solid obstacles which the horse has never seen before.

Eventing, ook wel 3-day eventing genoemd, is dus hetzelfde als Military.

http://www.eventingusa.com/

THE THREE-DAY EVENT EXPLAINED

Day One: Dressage

The First test is called a "dressage" test. Dressage is a French word meaning training. Originally designed to show the horse's capability on the parade ground in performing various movements involved with reviewing troops, today the dressage test comprises a set series of complicated movements performed in an enclosed arena. Precision, smoothness, suppleness and complete obedience show off the horse's gymnastic development. Ideally it should look as if the horse is performing of its own accord, carrying its rider in complete harmony. The test is scored on each movement, rather like the scoring in figure skating, and the overall harmony and precision of the whole exercise are taken into consideration.

Dressage is also very important to the three-day event rider for the purpose of conditioning the horse's muscles for the endurance test. They become fit, strong, and elastic to lengthen and shorten at a gallop. The purpose of the dressage test is to demonstrate the intense training the horse and rider have achieved to perform each movement with balance, suppleness, and precision timing. The horse is extremely fit and the energy that is contained within the horse is incredible. Therefore, it is a remarkable feat in itself to control this energy and have the horse use it to his fullest advantage.


Day Two: Endurance/Cross-Country

The second discipline in the three-day event is the endurance test. The object of the endurance test is to prove the speed, endurance and jumping ability of the true cross-country horse when he is well trained and brought to the peak of condition. At the same time, it demonstrates the rider's knowledge of pace and the use of this horse across country.

The endurance test includes four phases: Phases A and C, Roads and Tracks; Phase B, the Steeplechase; and Phase D, the Cross-Country. Each phase must be completed in a set time. Phase A of the roads and tracks is a warming-up period, usually done at a brisk trot, for the purpose of relaxing and loosening up both horse and rider. Phase A leads directly to the start for Phase B, the steeplechase. This phase is ridden at a strong gallop to achieve an average speed of 24 miles per hour with six to eight jumps. At the end of the steeplechase, the horse and rider go directly into Phase C, the second roads and tracks. This phase is very important for allowing the horse to relax and recover and to get his wind back to normal. The pace is usually a quiet trot, interspersed with periods of walking and an occasional relaxed canter. Some riders also dismount and run beside their horse during this phase.

The end of Phase C brings the pair to the ten-minute Vet Box prior to starting out on Phase D, the cross-country. Here the horse has a compulsory ten-minute rest allowing a panel of judges and veterinarians to check the horse's temperature, pulse, respiration, and soundness. If, in the opinion of the panel, the horse is not fit or sound enough to continue, he must be withdrawn from the competition. At this time the horse is sponged down, the tack is adjusted and he is prepared for the next phase. Those passing the inspection go to the start box ready for the most exciting phase of the whole endurance test.

The cross-country course is approximately two and three quarter to four miles long, is comprised of some twenty-four to thirty-six fixed and solid obstacles of great variety, and is ridden at a good gallop. Cross-country courses require horses and riders to be bold and smart and they also test stamina. Each combination of horse and rider must complete all four phases in order, on time and with as few penalties as possible. Phase D completes the endurance test of the three-day event.

In Olympic and World Championship competition, the total mileage to be covered on the speed and endurance phase can be up to twenty miles. The cross-country phase is the phase that appeals most to spectators and riders alike. It is the ultimate challenge to prepare a horse for this rigorous test. Unlike other sports, where only the human will and body are pitted against the clock, in eventing, or combined training, two minds and bodies have to work as one. As an additional attraction, eventing is the only high-risk Olympic sport that permits men and women to compete as equals. There are no separate divisions. Some of the top riders in the world today are women from many nations.


Day Three: Show Jumping

The third and final test takes place in the jumping arena. After the demands of the speed and endurance phases, horses undergo a thorough veterinary examination for soundness before they proceed to the show jumping phase. A series of colored fences in an enclosed ring have to be negotiated before the full three days of competition are finally over. The final phase tests the stamina and recovery of the horse after the endurance phase and shows that it is fit enough to continue work.

In the words of the F.E.I.* rule book: "The test on the third day is not an ordinary show jumping competition...Its sole object is to demonstrate that, on the day after a severe test of endurance, the horses have retained the suppleness, energy and obedience necessary for them to continue in service."

The show jumping course requires very exact riding; it consists of between twelve and fifteen show jumping obstacles, which normally include at least one combination, two spread fences, and in some cases a ditch or water jump. (A water jump on a show jumping course is a real test for a horse. On the cross-country course a horse is required to jump into water--on the show jumping course he is required to jump the entire obstacle without putting a foot into the water.) As is often the case with horses, they amaze us with their intelligence and ability and rise to the challenge admirably.

The show jumping courses are designed to test the horse's and the rider's ability to negotiate a variety of fences of differing heights, widths, and technicality. This requires the horse to be balanced and supple for tight turns and short distances between fences. He must be able to lengthen or shorten his stride in an instant. Therefore, the rider must know exactly where he is on the approach to a fence, and have an obedient horse that will respond to his commands. For the spectator, this sport is both exciting and breathtaking to watch, as just one single rail knocked down can change the standings dramatically.

At the end of the competition, scores for all the competitors are totaled. Each test is scored individually and the penalties accrued are added together for the final results. The lowest score is the winning score. In the case of a team competition, the individual scores of each of the four team members are added together. If all four team members have completed the competition the best three scores count and the team with the lowest team total is pronounced the winner.

Je suis Charlie.

paardje

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Link naar dit bericht Geplaatst door de TopicStarter: 04-04-02 12:54

Cassidy schreef:
What is Eventing?

Our sport could be termed an "equestrian triathlon". It involves working with your horse both on the flat and over jumps. Over the centuries it has developed from the tests for the ideal military charger. Today, the sport is most known for its cross-country phase where horse and rider gallop over an outside course of solid obstacles which the horse has never seen before.

Eventing, ook wel 3-day eventing genoemd, is dus hetzelfde als Military.

http://www.eventingusa.com/

THE THREE-DAY EVENT EXPLAINED

sorry, ik kan totaal geen engels!

Day One: Dressage

The First test is called a "dressage" test. Dressage is a French word meaning training. Originally designed to show the horse's capability on the parade ground in performing various movements involved with reviewing troops, today the dressage test comprises a set series of complicated movements performed in an enclosed arena. Precision, smoothness, suppleness and complete obedience show off the horse's gymnastic development. Ideally it should look as if the horse is performing of its own accord, carrying its rider in complete harmony. The test is scored on each movement, rather like the scoring in figure skating, and the overall harmony and precision of the whole exercise are taken into consideration.

Dressage is also very important to the three-day event rider for the purpose of conditioning the horse's muscles for the endurance test. They become fit, strong, and elastic to lengthen and shorten at a gallop. The purpose of the dressage test is to demonstrate the intense training the horse and rider have achieved to perform each movement with balance, suppleness, and precision timing. The horse is extremely fit and the energy that is contained within the horse is incredible. Therefore, it is a remarkable feat in itself to control this energy and have the horse use it to his fullest advantage.


Day Two: Endurance/Cross-Country

The second discipline in the three-day event is the endurance test. The object of the endurance test is to prove the speed, endurance and jumping ability of the true cross-country horse when he is well trained and brought to the peak of condition. At the same time, it demonstrates the rider's knowledge of pace and the use of this horse across country.

The endurance test includes four phases: Phases A and C, Roads and Tracks; Phase B, the Steeplechase; and Phase D, the Cross-Country. Each phase must be completed in a set time. Phase A of the roads and tracks is a warming-up period, usually done at a brisk trot, for the purpose of relaxing and loosening up both horse and rider. Phase A leads directly to the start for Phase B, the steeplechase. This phase is ridden at a strong gallop to achieve an average speed of 24 miles per hour with six to eight jumps. At the end of the steeplechase, the horse and rider go directly into Phase C, the second roads and tracks. This phase is very important for allowing the horse to relax and recover and to get his wind back to normal. The pace is usually a quiet trot, interspersed with periods of walking and an occasional relaxed canter. Some riders also dismount and run beside their horse during this phase.

The end of Phase C brings the pair to the ten-minute Vet Box prior to starting out on Phase D, the cross-country. Here the horse has a compulsory ten-minute rest allowing a panel of judges and veterinarians to check the horse's temperature, pulse, respiration, and soundness. If, in the opinion of the panel, the horse is not fit or sound enough to continue, he must be withdrawn from the competition. At this time the horse is sponged down, the tack is adjusted and he is prepared for the next phase. Those passing the inspection go to the start box ready for the most exciting phase of the whole endurance test.

The cross-country course is approximately two and three quarter to four miles long, is comprised of some twenty-four to thirty-six fixed and solid obstacles of great variety, and is ridden at a good gallop. Cross-country courses require horses and riders to be bold and smart and they also test stamina. Each combination of horse and rider must complete all four phases in order, on time and with as few penalties as possible. Phase D completes the endurance test of the three-day event.

In Olympic and World Championship competition, the total mileage to be covered on the speed and endurance phase can be up to twenty miles. The cross-country phase is the phase that appeals most to spectators and riders alike. It is the ultimate challenge to prepare a horse for this rigorous test. Unlike other sports, where only the human will and body are pitted against the clock, in eventing, or combined training, two minds and bodies have to work as one. As an additional attraction, eventing is the only high-risk Olympic sport that permits men and women to compete as equals. There are no separate divisions. Some of the top riders in the world today are women from many nations.


Day Three: Show Jumping

The third and final test takes place in the jumping arena. After the demands of the speed and endurance phases, horses undergo a thorough veterinary examination for soundness before they proceed to the show jumping phase. A series of colored fences in an enclosed ring have to be negotiated before the full three days of competition are finally over. The final phase tests the stamina and recovery of the horse after the endurance phase and shows that it is fit enough to continue work.

In the words of the F.E.I.* rule book: "The test on the third day is not an ordinary show jumping competition...Its sole object is to demonstrate that, on the day after a severe test of endurance, the horses have retained the suppleness, energy and obedience necessary for them to continue in service."

The show jumping course requires very exact riding; it consists of between twelve and fifteen show jumping obstacles, which normally include at least one combination, two spread fences, and in some cases a ditch or water jump. (A water jump on a show jumping course is a real test for a horse. On the cross-country course a horse is required to jump into water--on the show jumping course he is required to jump the entire obstacle without putting a foot into the water.) As is often the case with horses, they amaze us with their intelligence and ability and rise to the challenge admirably.

The show jumping courses are designed to test the horse's and the rider's ability to negotiate a variety of fences of differing heights, widths, and technicality. This requires the horse to be balanced and supple for tight turns and short distances between fences. He must be able to lengthen or shorten his stride in an instant. Therefore, the rider must know exactly where he is on the approach to a fence, and have an obedient horse that will respond to his commands. For the spectator, this sport is both exciting and breathtaking to watch, as just one single rail knocked down can change the standings dramatically.

At the end of the competition, scores for all the competitors are totaled. Each test is scored individually and the penalties accrued are added together for the final results. The lowest score is the winning score. In the case of a team competition, the individual scores of each of the four team members are added together. If all four team members have completed the competition the best three scores count and the team with the lowest team total is pronounced the winner.

Zoek je een instructrice in Amersfoort eo of Almere eo? Stuur me een PB!

Cassidy

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Link naar dit bericht Geplaatst: 04-04-02 14:38

Snap je het niet? Ik mis je berichtje?

Je suis Charlie.

SAKKIA

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Link naar dit bericht Geplaatst: 04-04-02 15:05

military is toch het zelfde als eventing. Military was een verkeerde naam om dat het te agrassief klonk of niet vriendelijk in elk geval en toen hebben ze er vo;gens mij eventing van gemaakt maar ik weet het niet zeker

benneton

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Link naar dit bericht Geplaatst: 04-04-02 15:27

EVENTING=SGW(Samengestelde Wedstrijd)
Dat SGW betekent dus:
Springen
Dressuur
Cross
in 1 wedstrijd.

Kytha

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Link naar dit bericht Geplaatst: 04-04-02 15:32

imker schreef:
Eventing =

dressuurproef, springparcours en dan een terreinrit met hindernissen binnen een bepaalde tijd (of het dichtst bij de optimale tijd) rijden....
a.s. zondag is er eventing in Etten Leur.


Bloos tof dat is hier !! Heb wel zin om te gaan kijken Haha!

Wie steeds achter de kudde aanloopt, sjouwt altijd door de stront

Imker

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Link naar dit bericht Geplaatst: 04-04-02 15:37


Achilles Spr. B+20 Dr. L1+21 L2+17 M1+2!!
Olivius Dr. L2+15 M1+13, M2+15, Z1+10, Z2+2, promotie naar P-paard!!!


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